Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The Long Game


Playing the Long Game

Are you a distance runner or a sprinter? Once, many many years ago (before I knew I had asthma) I ran track. Many of my friends were in it for the sprint. I could do the short runs, and I tied with the fastest girl on our team, but where I really excelled was in distance. It wasn't because I was fast, it was because I knew how to set a pace and stick to it.

As I get older I've noticed the people who seem to succeed in life are the ones who have figured out the long game.

So how does that apply to writing, and what the heck does it have to do with being insecure?

Diagram A
Well, I write in the long term. My debut novel is part of a trilogy which is a partner series to two others trilogies that all tie up together in a capstone series. (See diagram A, for Amazingly Insane.) Yes, we're talking 10 to 12 books. Because there's so much story, it's impossible to tell all of it in a single book, or even a single series, and this is where the pacing comes in.

Now the insecurity. There is a TON of world/character building that goes into a project like this. SO MUCH. When beta readers (or my editor) come back and ask certain things I reply, "Do you want to be surprised in the next book, or do you want me to spoil it for you?" I guess it all comes down to impatience. I want to scream, "Dude, I've got reasons for EVERYTHING and you are going to freak out when you learn them!" But I can't. Nope. I have to sit back and grimace because I can see the long game, but I'm the only one. On the flip side, I'm constantly biting my nails as to whether I should have given away more. How do we reconcile and find a balance?



Ready to meet a new author and enter to win an amazing book? 

Last week, the spunky Sheena-Kay Graham shared SACRIFICE HER with us, along with two truths and one lie. Those who guessed the lie correctly were entered into a random drawing for the chance to win a book of their choice from the grab pool.

Sheena-kay's game:


1. Sheena-kay has written song lyrics but can’t sing at all.
2. She won a three legged race against her brother at a family picnic.
3. She thinks it's creepy burying someone at sea without permission, even if it’s a terrorist.

And the lie is: 

#2. Sheena-kay says, one, she doesn't do running, and two, she wished she had family picnics.

Way to guess those of you who got it right! And the winner is:

...DRUM ROLL...

Catherine Stine!

Congrats Catherine! 

And now to today's feature:

I am a champion athlete with all the skills of a fighter. I should have been untouchable.

A brilliant surgeon known for his invention of Modi’s—the only cure for the deadly disease, vaincre—has gone rogue with his experiments, and the Monarchy is desperate to shut him down. That's where Aeva Storm comes in, a champion athlete with an ego to match. Aeva is the surgeon's secret weapon against the Monarchy. And they'll never know what hit them. After reconstructing her body to become a Modi unlike any he's ever created, Aeva is forced into a fight against all odds. She'll have to break loyalties, hurt family, and turn her back on newly awakened love. Thousands of lives hang in the balance in a battle that will set forth a new era.

Join Aeva on her quest to see whether she's got what it takes to go up against the most powerful humans ever created.

Pick up your copy HERE.

Now let me introduce you to this fashionable and very kind author: 

Anna Soliveres has always been a storyteller but it wasn't until her early twenties when she began writing novel length works. The result was an enthusiasm to get better at the craft until her work could be shared with the world. Releasing in March 2014, Violet Storm is her debut novel. Anna is currently working on another young adult science fiction series, titled Snow Dolls, set to release in late 2014.

Her favorite cheese is goat cheese (with jam) and you can find her eating it outdoors on a picnic blanket with a glass of wine.


AND IT'S HER BIRTHDAY!!!
(Wish her happy birthday, eh?)


Anna gave me two truths and one lie to test your "lie detector" skills. Those who figure out the lie will go into my magic hat to win an eBook of VIOLET STORM. 

You have until Tuesday, June 10, at 1 p.m. EDT to guess--and be sure to come back for the answer on June 11.

TRUTH OR LIE

1. Anna is an accomplished vocal performer.
2. She was a Police Cadet.
3. She had nine different jobs while in college.


Help me with the cover reveal (book 2 in the Maiden of Time Trilogy) July 14-19.
Sign up HERE.
(This is just a logo.)

OH! And I should mention, the first page of SOULLESS is up for review/critique today @

&

Pop in and voice your opinion, eh? 


Which is the lie? Doesn't the concept for Anna's book sound fabulous? Are you a distance runner? What long game are you working toward? Are you insecure about projects you're working on? Oh hey, and wish Anna a great birthday, eh? 

156 comments:

  1. I am all about the marathon as opposed to the spring when it comes to the race we call life :) I am a firm believer that the journey is half of the fun and we should never get too caught up in the "I'm not where I want to be right this second" mindset. Though that admittedly is easier said than done.

    Oh and I totally think #3 is a fib :)

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    1. That's so true. I typically have a hard time staying focused on the present rather than what I'm reaching for in the future, but if we can merge those two viewpoints, we're all good.

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  2. Struggling with whether to give away more is a constant battle of mine, too. I don't have as long (# of books) as you have planned, but even a single trilogy or a chapter book set can pose this same issue. I'm constantly asking myself questions. I CHEER you for acknowledging the long distance aspect of writing .... and life. lol

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    1. It's a tricky battle, right? I wonder sometimes how much easier life would be if I wrote stand alones. =)

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  3. Patience is very difficult for me but I think you are so right about the long game. I'm working on trying to be more successful at that now.

    Fun to learn more about Sheena-kay and Happy Birthday to Anna! I've never met her so have no clue but I'm going with #1 as the lie.

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    1. Patience is the greatest lesson you learn in life--at least that's what I think. =)

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  4. I am blown away by the amount of world building you are doing/will have to do! But I also have no doubt that you can do it, that you'll find the balance, and that your readers will be totally grateful for the twists and turns and surprises.

    Oh, and the pic of Phoebe running totally cracked me up. I remember that episode…. :)

    Madeline @ The Shellshank Redemption

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    1. Thanks for the kind words, Madeline. You rock!

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  5. I'm definitely in it for the long term - I've had a goal, that I want to achieve at 56 years old, since I was about 25!

    Your writing goal is truly ambitious - good luck!

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    1. Whew! 56 huh? That's definitely planning in the long term. Love it!

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  6. Great post! We're all in this for the long haul. The writer who is mega-successful with her/his 1st book is so rare.

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    1. It's true, and I think sometimes that instant success ruins a person.

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  7. Wow, that's a lot of books! It can be hard to find a balance between foreshadowing and giving too much away. But I also love reading books which, like the Harry Potter series, do a really good job of foreshadowing things ahead of time which turn out to be significant later. It takes a lot of planning!

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    1. It certainly does, and if executed right, they make for the best series, eh?

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  8. Holding information back for the long term is definitely hard for the author. J.K. Rowling's original version of her first Harry Potter book apparently gave away much of what was to happen in the subsequent series, so she had to go back and rip everything that wasn't necessary for the first book. Just hang in there.

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    1. I could tell she totally gutted that book. It was cram-packed with absolutely necessary story.

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  9. I could watch that running gif for ages hahaha I'm just going to guess #3 :P
    And as long as the long game eventually arrives readers will be stoked, just think of every tv/book series ever :)

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    1. I know! It would be epic, right? I could like, write this story for the rest of my life... (Erm, not really, but it's an interesting thought.)

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  10. Writing is all about the long haul, that's for sure. Some have written 12 books by the time they get the one that breaks through, I bet. :-)

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    1. I bet too. I'm not thinking about that though--but about the fun of finally getting this grandiose story out in the world.

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  11. I feel you, Crystal. It is really hard to find a good balance.

    Saw the reviews on Violet Storm at Amazon. The book's reaping good ones. Way to go and happy birthday to Anna. Oh, and hello to Sheena-Kay.

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    1. SO hard to balance. Some days I think I have a lead weight in one arm. ;)

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  12. My cardiologist won't let me run long distances. Never has. I wish I could, though. I enjoy it; I just can't do it.

    With writing, however, I can do the marathon thing. ;)
    IWSG #215 until Alex culls the list again.

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    1. Well that's okay. I don't run long distances either. In fact, biking is way more enjoyable--but I thought running was cool before I figured that out. ;)

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  13. I loathe running, but I see your analogy. Keeping all those threads in a trilogy must be a challenge. I've seen some of JK Rowling's notes online--it's dizzying!

    Happy birthday, Anna!

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    1. LOL. I loath it too, but I still do it--because it's the easiest way to keep my core body strength.

      I totally need to seek out Rowling's notes. I have a funny feeling there'd be a huge sense of sisterhood there.

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  14. I hate running in all forms too, but I am all about the walk. I can walk for miles and love every minute of. I might get there slowly, but I'm enjoying the trip.

    I'm going with the vocal thing. Throwing it out as a guess. Book looks awesome.

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    1. I love that--walking slowly but enjoying the trip. Awesome.

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  15. Third one is the lie. Only because I have no idea.
    I do better at distance, although I can't say I plan my writing far in advance. I did have a situation similar to yours where I answered a concern in the next book.

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    1. The above diagram, that's the result of plotting out a series for 20+ years while learning how to write. Dangerous mix. I think it's good keeping the reader in suspense--especially as an Indie.

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  16. Great sports analogy. You must have stamina to complete ONE novel and see it to publication. A trilogy requires commitment!
    Play off the Page

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    1. It's true, but once you get that one book over the finish line, you learn you've only just begun. =)

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  17. I totally get having all of those books that tie together--I've had a book series in mind since I was 14 that was going to span thousands of years and several different characters, jumping back and forth in time. It's a lot of work!

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    1. Yay! I started with this one at 13. *high five* Here's to long-term planners, eh?

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  18. Wow! That's a lot of books planned through your first story idea. It's cool and sounds like you really have it well thought out.

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    1. LOL. My first story idea happened when I was 3 years old. =) This series was based off multiple ideas that came at varying seasons and just happened to all tie together.

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  19. That's a pretty impressive plan for your books! Talk about the long game! And yes, I'm in it for the long game (I swam, not ran, but I did distance). And you're absolutely right, it's about finding a pace, and sticking it out. Sometimes, you get off pace and you have to decide, push through the pain or flag off a bit. (Never give up, never surrender!)

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    1. Yes! Goonies never say die! =)

      I love swimming, but I never could do it for anything but relaxation and fun. That's awesome that you swam distance!

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  20. It's always a good thing to write for the long run. I've written a four-book series, and I am writing a sequel now (soon to be a series) for Hurricane Crimes. :) Although I haven't started them yet, my four-book series has four spin-off series of four books attached to it, so that's 24. Wow! I hadn't even done the math on that before. Eek!

    Happy Birthday, Anna! :D

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    1. LOL. You're totally playing the same game. LOVE it. =)

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  21. Loved this post....we do have to be in it for the long haul, even those of us with series that aren't intertwined as tightly as yours. Wow!

    D.B. McNicol
    Romance & Mystery...writing my life

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    1. Here's to well planned plots and endurance, eh?

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  22. That Catherine! How does she do it? As for the next one, I'm going to guess #3 is the lie.

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    1. I know! She's got a lucky bone, I think. But then, you must too. (That or you bribed the gods of randomness.) ;)

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  23. Happy Birthday and Congratulations to Anna!!
    *sigh - my poor TBR list* lol! She looks like she can sing so I'll go with #1. ^_^

    Like, dude, your diagram is crazy! My brain would implode if I tried to do that. That's freaking amazing! It definitely takes patience to stay on this road, especially if you're tackling a world that large.

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    1. I think after 20+ years of developing story ideas, anyone would have something that complicated. Here's to planning, plotting and rocket launchers! (Or maybe I should change that last one to cheese.)

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  24. It took me awhile to get here but I am finally all about the long haul, when it comes to everything but especially my writing.
    I am so impressed with your chart, I love it!
    Thank you for being so supportive to other authors.
    Happy Birthday Anna!!
    doreenmcgettigan.com

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    1. *high five* Here's to reaching that happy place and finding you pace.

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  25. Wow, I can't imagine keeping everything straight for that many books. I worry about consistency just in the trilogy I'm writing. Best of luck in finding that balance!
    Happy Birthday, Anna!

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    1. And that's enough. A trilogy is a long haul as is. (Sanity is a debatable thing for authors, right?)

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  26. I was a long-distance swimmer, so I totally loved your analogy to writing. I'm impressed at the amount of world building you must do for 12 books. (It sounds a bit like what Rowling must've done.)
    Thanks for the encouragement today!

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    1. She had that story in her head for ages, and I've been stewing on mine for 20+ years, so I imagine it's one of those things that comes with time, eh?

      Jenni, thanks for popping in. You know I'll cheer you any day. =)

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  27. Happy birthday to Anna! I'm going with #2 as the lie.

    Your long term goal seems amazing to me, I can't wait to follow along your journey and read it ALL! So a pretty face and a genius? Add cheese and you're the rockiest awesomest chick-author around! lol Best of luck with the short runs, they will make the long race so much more satisfying. :)

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    1. *blushing* Flatter much? Okay, you're hired. You're officially on my cheese payroll for keeping me going when I hit the doldrums. =) You rock!

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  28. Replies
    1. Or does the long game play with you? Oooh!

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  29. I agree with taking your time, it definitely pays off, even though patience is hard to do.
    lucindawhitney.com

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    1. I think it's the hardest lesson to learn, but the most beneficial. Here's to hard lessons and becoming awesome!

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  30. Oh wow, that is an amazing plan! You're right about the pacing, it's something I'm still learning.

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    1. Isn't it something we're all learning? No matter how well you think you've mastered the lesson, there's always more to overcome, understand, or reach.

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  31. I'm in the same boat. My first trilogy is part of a whole bigger world and a bigger story. It's exhausting, especially for really impatient people like me. You're right, though. You have to look at the long haul, which isn't easy.

    And I SWEAR I signed up for your cover reveal. Either I did it, or I dreamed that I did it.

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    1. You totally did sign up. Because you rock. Yup.

      *fist bump* Here's to epic-sized story worlds!

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  32. First things first, Happy Birthday Anna!
    The lie is no.#2? Yes? No?
    12 books? Wow! This takes the meaning of series to a whole new level... my first time hearing of a capstone series...!
    You ROCK!

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    1. You watch, this will be a new trend. As Indie publishing rises to the surface, there will be more and more authors who build amazing worlds.

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  33. Anna's book sounds wonderful! I'm thinking the lie is #1. My daughter's b-day is today:)

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    1. Aw! Happy birthday to your daughter...a few days late.

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  34. Wow that is a serious amount of writing! I definitely agree on going for the long game.

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    1. Well, we're serious writers, right? ;)

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  35. I totally get this about the planning and the multiple trilogies in the same world as well as wanting to tell everyone everything already. I often have to stop myself from giving away all the secrets. It's hard.

    Happy Birthday to Anna! I'm going to guess #3 is the lie.

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    1. Here's to the secret keepers! We are epic. Yes, we are. =)

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  36. In no way, shape, or form am I a sprinter! I've always been in for the long haul. My forte is endurance. I was fascinated with your plan for so many books! It's inspiring! Take care, Crystal!

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    1. Inspiring or insane, because some days I think it might be both. =)

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  37. I stand in awe of the worlds you hold in your heart and head. Do you have each book plotted and written down? Or is it all stored in your imagination? You were obviously designed for long distance races.

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    1. I don't know why I've come up as anonymous: it's me - Julia Lund :)

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    2. Weird.

      With 20 years of imagining and planning, these are plotting in both places--head and digitally or on paper. Some of it is tucked away on notes, other portions are just part of me. I guess that's how it goes when we spend long enough with a story, eh?

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  38. I figured out long ago that I needed to pace myself... now I have to learn how to do that... :) I am not that great as I am impatient as I am sure you know from reading my blog... I realize that is what gets me in trouble but I have yet to learn to step back... I will need to take a page from your book Crystal :)

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    1. As long as it's a page I can spare...because a story with a missing page might be slightly annoying to readers. ;) Kidding, kidding. We're all figuring it out, right Launna?

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  39. Happy Birthday to Anna! I'm going to guess #3 is the lie.

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  40. I'll say the lie is #1. Happy Birthday to Anna! I can be a sprinter and a long-distance runner (both literally and figuratively :p). I sometimes plan waaaay too far in advance and get obsessed with that part of it. But then sometimes the only way I can get anything done is furious sprints.

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    1. I know what you mean about getting stuck in the long vision. My mom used to have to tell me to live in the here and now. She's smart like that. =)

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  41. Happy Birthday, Anna! I think your lie is #3.

    Hi, Crystal! I thought my next project was complex. It's only a trilogy. Silly me :)

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    1. LOL. I'm sure it's plenty complex. A trilogy is nothing to balk at.

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  42. So true & great advice. I always say....slow and steady wins the race. :-)

    Happy birthday, Anna!

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    1. That or it builds truly epic muscles. I like muscles.

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  43. Anna's cover is gorgeous!

    Capstone series? Your diagram boggles the mind, Crystal! I've never even heard of such a thing. You must be awesome with flowcharts. :)

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    1. Or have just spent way too much time lurking in my own imagination. =)

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  44. Happy birthday to Anna! Her cover is stunning. My guess for the lie is #1.

    It's sometimes so hard not to spill the beans when you know everything that's going to happen and no one else does. I, at least, tell it all to my CPs, so I can blab on about it! *LOL*

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    1. LOL. You did an epic job of that with your 13th Floor series. It all tied in so nicely and I was truly impressed. =)

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  45. Wow, that's a really intricate set up for your novels. It'll be so awesome when it's finished.

    Lie... #1.

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    1. AMEN! And let's hope I don't kill over in the process, eh?

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  46. I'm most definitely playing the long game. I once planned for the three novel series I was plotting to all be part of the same multiverse, and even made a document called THE EVERYTHING PLAN for writing the eventual crossover. None of it ever came together, but hey, I can dream. ^_^ And as much as I'm trying to think of it as its own story, one of my plots-in-progress could definitely be the core of a multiversal crossover. Grr. Arg.

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    1. THE EVERYTHING PLAN... I LOVE it. I think I have a similar document somewhere, although I don't know what I titled it. =)

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  47. I'm trying to play the long game. It's a little tricky when all my ideas are stand alone novels. I have one series, but that's it. Oh well, I can still make a long game work for me. =)

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    1. Hey, Dean Koontz only wrote stand alones for forever, and he's crazy popular. You have to go with what works for you.

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  48. Writing is definitely the long game. We need to pace ourselves and set up a rhythm so we can keep going for the long haul. I love your book plan. Awesome!

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    1. Setting rhythm now... Oh, maybe I should try it without the spoons. Thumping them makes it hard to type. ;)

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  49. I love those stories that take place over a number of books. 10 to 12 is mighty ambitious though - I wish you luck!

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  50. What? I thought I followed your blog long ago but found I hadn't when I tried to sign in. Fixed that. Your multi-book plan is even more ambitious than the one I gave up on because of editing. I'm still caught between two loves. If you love writing, your plan is doable. Already signed on for your cover reveal, but do you want to do a guest post before that?

    Happy birthday, Anna! My guess is that 9 jobs in college doesn't fit your style or ambition.

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    1. I bet you did follow my blog a long time ago, and then it got away. Trixy blogs. ;)

      Thanks for signing on! You totally rock.

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  51. Happy birthday! I'm guessing the lie is #2.

    Interlocking books and series can be so complicated. If I were neurotypical, I'm not so sure I would've ever happily, voluntarily taken on three (originally four and many more planned) interlocking, interconnected Atlantic City series, most of them set during the same timeline. At least I slightly uncomplicated matters by spinning off the stories of the European-born characters into their own series instead of having that material as periodic interludes and a sobering alternate trajectory.

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    1. Ahem. Each of your single books is like a series, so um, I think you've got this one in the bag. ;)

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  52. I wish Anna a Happy Birthday! Yay Geminis! And I love the cover of her novel.

    It makes sense that you'd plot out so many books when you spend so much time world building. Why make a different world for every book? That's not efficient. I'd like to do a series but won't because I'm hoping one of my ideas will one day attract a Big 5 pubber...

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    1. I totally agree. It's all about efficiency. *shifty eyes*

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  53. Happy Birthday, Anna! You rock :) And, hmm, I'm guessing #1, though really I have no idea!

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    1. Well, we'll take it, idea-less or otherwise. =)

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  54. Thank you so much for the feature, Crystal! Love it!!

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  55. Happy birthday, Anna! I'm guessing number three is a lie.

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  56. Happy Birthday, Anna!

    Pacing is a tough thing, and I definitely know what you mean by when readers ask a question. I just wanna say, "Wait for it...wait for it..." hehe Good luck on that project! It looks big, and I'm sure it is!

    I will guess that the lie is #2.

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    1. Yes! I'll refer them to your comment next time I hear grumbling. =)

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  57. I'm sure you heard this... every book should stand alone. But really? I read the Maze Runner and I was like...huh? Book one really told nothing about the overall story and I loved it and read the others. This doesn't help, I know. I guess trust in your editor and betas. Good luck!

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    1. I hated The Maze Runner. Just sayin. It didn't resolve ANYTHING at the end and it just left me frustrated. Regardless, there is a time and place for that. It works better in Indie publishing than traditional methinks.

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  58. I'm in it for the long game too. And I think #1 is the lie.

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  59. Ok, there's the long game, and then there's the super iron man marathon game. That is impressive!!! I'm more of a wimpy long game writer myself :)

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    1. *pulling on superhero greaves* Whatever. I can loan you my cape if it will help you feel bolder. You are totally in this for the long haul. =)

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  60. You really do have to be like a marathon runner to succeed in many thing in life!

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  61. Happy Birthday to Anna! I pick #1 as her lie.

    As to what you wrote... balance is something we learn the longer we write. Since I only have a vague idea about the rest of my series, surprises happen all the time in my books. I have in mind what I want revealed in the book for the overall series arc, then each POV character has an arc in each book. The next book builds on things that happened previously. I don't know if that's hopeful or not.

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    1. I love it when the stories get to surprise you. I used to write that way, but they've been in development so long the surprises are smaller and smaller. It's a good thing though. I find I write faster this way.

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  62. I definitely think long-term. It's funny--when I was a kid, teen/kids books were long, never-ending series. Year after year, more books. I had started a series and my agent asked how many books I planned to do. I said I wanted to just go with it forever and she said, nope, not how it works. So it's changed a lot since I was a child. Now series must have an end...5 books or so is the limit, I guess, but many are only three-book series.

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    1. You know, with the expansion and ease of Indie publishing, I think we're going to see those stipulations fade. Granted, I want a finite end to the series I read, but there are people who love them to go on and on.

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  63. Yes, writing a series is definitely about pacing! And keeping all those details straight, goodness!--best of luck and much cheese to ya. Yep, it'd definitely be a balancing game of how much to reveal, and when. :)

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  64. Holy moly, that's a lot of books that all tie together and it sounds amazing!

    Happy birthday to Anna and congrats to both Anna and Catherine!

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  65. Wow, so impressed with your long term plan for your novels. And yes, you have to keep things close to your chest because you don't want to give away too much too soon. I get it!

    I think the lie is #2. Congrats Anna and happy belated birthday! I'm a little late to the party, I know. Shame on me. :)

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    1. Well, as long as you get it, I'm all good to go. And hey, we'll take you to any party, late or early. We all need a little Kristin cheer. =)

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  66. Happy birthday to Anna. I think 1 is the lie.

    I think long-term. One has to in order to get anything substantial done.

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  67. Well, hey, how's that for a big surprise! Thanks for picking me as the winner! You have my email, right? As for my style, I am a long game planner. Yet I did find figuring out a series quite a challenge! Enough so, that I am stalled on book 3 of the Fireseed books.

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    1. I know. I'm lame. I should have contacted you earlier. Goodness, I hate it when you get stuck. I'll be sending virtual cheese your way!

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  68. Wow. That is a lot of stories to tie together. I don't beta many stories that are series books, so I'd probably be one that says... I want to know this now! :)

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    1. LOL. Well only the readers of this blog and my editor know, so hopefully it will be okay. I mean, every trilogy and book will tie up nicely, so hopefully readers will survive. =)

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  69. When you know how to pace yourself for the long game you also build toughness and endurance. That's a good thing.

    You do have a major set of projects, don't you? Wow. But editors are a bit different from your readers, lol! They want to know the plan--even if the plan changes somewhat between now and then. I know I've been involved with numerous proposals for series. That's where you write out a general outline and a sketch of the characters, the arc, the black moment, of each book and the endings. I've also gone back and read the finished works of the proposals that brought in the contract. You be surprised how many changes happen between the two.

    Sia McKye Over Coffee

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    1. They do. Of course you can only have a first impression once. I'm a total fan of analyzing the whole story arc with a fine toothed comb though.

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  70. 12 books...yes, I am so impressed by you. I can't imagine. Though I am starting work on my fourth in a series, I guess, so I'm a third of the way there. I think #1 is the lie.

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    1. You can be more impressed when I've written all of them. Only 5 are written now.

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  71. Most of us are in short-term mode so much of the time, we fail to consider the full picture. It's a great skill to have Crystal.

    I'm guessing #3 is the lie.

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    1. Here's to seeing the view through the trees, eh?

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  72. Hi Crystal - sounds such a good perspective to have and so good luck .. but don't let the cat out of the bag! Good luck to the two new authors and Happy Birthday to Anna .. and I think # 2 - a police cadet .. cheers Hilary

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  73. Happy Birthday to Anna! Her book sounds exciting. I think #2 is the lie. :)

    Crystal- Wow! You really do have to play a long game for the writing you are doing. Impressive. I love when things get revealed little by little and that pieces fall into place when I read more books in a series. Best of luck!
    ~Jess

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    1. Thanks, Jess. I'm hoping it will all play out that way.

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  74. Happy birthday Anna! No 1 is the lie!

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  75. I knooooooow! *sob*

    My YA Epic Fantasy is only five books long (or going to be), but every time someone asks: "But how is this relevant?!" I have to be like: "Wait three books, can you?!"

    Which reminds me... I sent you a mail... ;-)

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    1. LOL. *pats Misha's back* Guess that's why we have each other, right? Who else could possibly understand?

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  76. Interesting. I have only ever tried writing short stories but can imagine how hard it is to know how much to reveal and how much to hold back for later.

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    1. I bet you be better at it than you think. =)

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  77. Happy birthday. I hope you had a wonderful celebration.

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  78. Always love coming to visit your blog, Crystal. Its interesting, fun, and there's always something going on. I was a distance runner, not in school, but I used to run 10 K's every weekend in my 20's and I've completed a couple marathons in my lifetime. I guess that qualifies me. Your 'distance' project sounds like a monumental task that must simultaneously excite and weigh down at times. Wow, you really are super-woman! That's really great. I think Anna doesn't sing publically, so #1 is the lie is my guess. And happy birthday to Anna. Maria @ Delight Directed Living

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    1. Aw, thanks, Maria. We try to keep things on the happening side. Whew! You ran 10 and 20K's? That's epic. (And you call me a super-woman! I need to borrow YOUR cape.)

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  79. I'm definitely a sprinter. I'm all gusto and then.....zzzzzzz. I have to make myself a timetable so I can do the distance but generally end up failing as I like instant results. Sigh....no bloody patience.

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    1. Well, if it's not bloody then it must be living, so you must be feeding it and doing something right. =) You crack me up, woman.

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Hit me with your cheese!