Wednesday, April 2, 2014

A Dyslexic IWSG and A to Z: B

My apologies for a busy post today, but you're about to discover PURE AWESOMENESS. (That's a promise.) First, some exciting news! For the month of April ONLY, MOONLESS is $1.99! Get your copy HERE.


Hosted by Alex J. CavanaughHart Johnson, Chemist Ken, Candilynn Fite, Terri Rochenski, Clare Dugmore, and Lilica Blake, IWSG happens every first Wednesday of the month and is an opportunity for writers to express their deep seeded worries. 

This last month, I took a "reading test." Now for some of us, reading comes easy. For some (pointing to self) it takes a great deal of effort to become proficient, even while loving the written word. We've never been formally diagnosed, but my sisters and I have all struggled with reading. For me it was always an issue of reading out of sequence, whether mixing up letters or actual words. Most people read in a line, right? One word after another? I can't get my brain to work that way.

SO, I took a reading test...

Now, let me clarify, I'm constantly reading about 8 to 10 books, with a steady 1/2 hr of reading every morning plus an additional 10 to 30 minutes reading out loud each night--and regular binge reading. I typically finish 2 to 5 books a week (we're not talking picture books here), with a few stolen hours around the crazy of life, and I NEVER ever forget a book I've read.

So the reading test results? Average.

Brr?

The conclusion: I suck at tests, and should avoid taking them whenever possible. I have great reading comprehension, and when I burn through a full novel in a total of 4 to 8 hrs, well, I'd say that's an accomplishment considering my history. Who cares what a stupid test says, and more importantly, I can't let it get me down.

I'm awesome. I've overcome some major obstacles, and I should rejoice in that.

How about you? Have you ever struggled with reading?


True heroes are all around us, in our every day lives, but some people stand out. During this A-Z Challenge I hope to share several of my real life heroes, and invite you to share yours in the comments.

righam Young. So maybe you've heard his name mentioned. He's basically the reason the western part of the US (other than California) is populated. This guy led a church of people who had been condemned to death under an extermination order in Missouri. I bet you didn't know that. Yes, the governor made it legal to kill Mormons. Welcome to the land of the free. Seeking for freedom and safety, after having appealed to the US government several times and been denied, the people packed up and followed Brigham into the desert. Yes, desert. As in little rain, no crops, and a hard existence--initially.

Now this is the part that gets me. After they left the US and were no longer a part of it, the military actually sent an order for them to supply a number of men to assist in the Mexican/American war. You know, the military that let them be raped and pillaged and killed while under their "protection." Brigham gathered up a battalion of men and sent them anyway. He had been tested and humbled early in his association with the church when the founder and his friend, Joseph Smith, publicly condemned him for being a sinner and calling him to repentance--when no actual offence had been committed. It was a test. Brigham's reply was an apology, with a hung head, and a promise to do better. Joseph embraced him, and expressed his love, then corrected the accusation. This humble man had proved his character in the face of public humiliation.

Brigham loved his family and actually started an organization for his many daughters that continues today, a program that includes goals and standards to cultivate talents, knowledge, growth, and lays the foundation for contributing members of society and future mothers.

Lastly, if you live in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho etc, you may be living in one of the communities Brigham started by sending groups to establish them. To me, Brigham is an example of fortitude, humility, and enterprising.

I want to be as determined, steady and entrepreneurial as him. I want to be an accomplisher of epic stuff, although I can do without the death and mayhem.


Are you ready to meet a new author and enter to win an awesome book? 

Last week, Emma Adams shared Darkness Watching with us, along with two truths and one lie. Those who guessed the lie correctly were entered into a random drawing for the chance to win her eBook!

Emma's game:
1. Emma scuba-dived in the Great Barrier Reef.

2. She wrote Darkness Watching while living in a cabin in the Costa Rican jungle.

3. She's never been to the USA. 

And the lie is: 

#3. Emma has technically been to the US, but only overnight when her plane back from Costa Rica got stranded at the Houson, TX airport.

Way to guess those of you who got it right! You are officially human lie detectors. And the winner is:

...DRUM ROLL...

Suzanne Furness!

Congrats Suzanne!

And now to today's feature, a book I TOTALLY love:

The kids at Sam's school never knew if they should make fun of her for being too smart or too dumb. That's what it means to be dyslexic: smart, and illiterate. Sam is sick of it. So when her mom gets a job in a faraway city, Sam decides not to tell anyone about her little illiteracy problem. Without her paradox of a reputation, she falls in with a new group of highly competitive friends who call themselves the Brain Trust. When she meets Nate, her charming valedictorian lab partner, she declares her new reality perfect. But in order to keep it that way, she has to keep her learning disability a secret. The books are stacked against her and so are the lies. Sam's got to get the grades, get the guy, and get it straight--without being able to read.

Pick up your copy HERE.

And now, let me introduce you to the wonderful author: 
Kate Scott lives in the suburbs outside Portland, Oregon with her husband Warren. Kate was diagnosed with dyslexia as a young child but somehow managed to fall in love with stories anyway. Counting to D is her first novel. When Kate isn’t writing, she enjoys listening to audiobooks, camping, and spending time with her friends and family. Kate also spends a lot of time doing math and sciency things and is a licensed professional engineer.

Kate loves Mozzarella melted on pizza.

Kate gave me two truths and one lie to test your "lie detector" skills. Those who figure out the lie will go into my magic hat for a chance to win Counting to D (eBook). Awesome, right? You have until Tuesday, April 8, at 1 p.m. EDT to guess--and be sure to come back for the answer on April 9.

TRUTH OR LIE

1. Kate is allergic to ketchup.
2. Kate's left foot once stayed asleep (pins and needles) for three years.
3. She once built a 15-foot snowman with a forklift.


Okay friendlies, which is the lieHave you ever struggled with reading? Have you checked out Kate's awesome book? Are there any explorers, expansionists or visionaries you admire?  

144 comments:

  1. I never struggled with reading as a kid, but I've noticed the older I get, the more distracted I get. I don't focus or concentrate as easily as I once did. Something I am definitely going to be aware of and work on…or maybe just go with it and see where those distractions take me…. :)

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    1. It's true. It can be so much harder to hone your concentration when you have so much on the brain. As kids we definitely didn't suffer from over-thinking. =)

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  2. Hi, Crystal! Don't worry about the test results. I suck at tests like that, too.

    Love the book featured here. Taking note of it.

    SittieCates

    Latest Blog Post: #AtoZChallenge Post: B for Bubbles Day by Ally Nathaniel

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    1. Yay! Great to see you, Sittie. Off to check out your bubbles. =)

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  3. Hmm. I'm guessing that she could be allergic to ketchup if she's allergic to citric acid. I think I'm going to guess that the lie is 3. (Though I hate to think she had pins and needles for three years. Ugh.)

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  4. I don't think I took a reading test unless those in school you took after you read a book says anything. I always read below my level and didn't get to my level until recently. But look at us being big book lovers!!

    Also I raved about COUTING TO D on my blog (: I think number one is a lie. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Look at us book lovers indeed. Counting to D is definitely a great read. I hope more people pick it up.

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  5. Pfft don't listen to some silly test. I wish I could read as much as you do. And I'm going to guess that #2 is the lie, mostly because it's making me cringe just thinking about it...

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    1. Me too! (And thanks for the kind words.)

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  6. If you're reading that many books, then you're definitely an above average reader. Sounds to me like your "reading difficulties" come from your mind racing so far ahead because you're so excited about reading.

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    1. You know, that's a great way to look at it. There you go. I'm not stubborn, I'm determined. I'm not a troubled reader, I'm and excited one. =)

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  7. I think those tests are usually for the birds. Obviously you are way above average!

    I don't know a lot about Brigham Young so this was interesting to read.

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    1. Glad to provide some information and entertainment. Thanks, Julie.

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  8. Tests are just tests. Reality is what matters. I have a high level of comprehension but I'm a really slow reader, so I'm sure I'd do poorly on that test as well.

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    1. Probably. I agree. Tests are pretty much worthless.

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  9. My mom has dyslexia and I, while never having been diagnosed, feel I have at least a mild form as well. Mostly like you the mixing up of words. It is a pain, but I love to read and write so we train ourselves to do this.

    Brandon Ax: Writer's Storm

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    1. Our weaknesses become our strengths, eh? We seek to overcome and become our own heroes. =)

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  10. Very interesting! I didn't know even half of this...so now I am enlightened thanks to you. Good luck with the A-Z! ♥

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    1. Thanks, Kathy. It is fascinating when you dig into history some of the things you learn. Those who don't know the past are doomed to repeat it.

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  11. I'm SOOO impressed and JEALOUS that you read so much. Where do you FIND THE TIME?! I get through a book a month, I'm lucky. Sad but true. There are just not enough hours to do everything.

    Tests are bogus... don't give it a second thought!

    Interesting theme for you A-Z Crystal...

    Really interesting about Bringham...

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    1. LOL. I don't FIND time, I make it--like while working out on the elliptical, or while reading to my littles, or studying because I want to learn something new. I think the most effective way to become a great author is to read great authors.

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  12. I'm wondering what they actually tested and how they did it. Not many people can read so much in a week.

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    1. It was a timed reading, followed by a questionnaire for comprehension. It wasn't super invested, and I wasn't super invested after finishing. I actually wanted to go put my head under a pillow, but that's another story for another day. =)

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  13. Now I'm curious about a reading test and wonder if I would take offense if it says I suck lol I wish I could read more though, so I'm jealous of you for that :P

    And WOW Brigham is such an inspiration. Like you, I would like to do stuff...eat cheese...and avoid death and mayhem.

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  14. Interesting hero, Brigham Young. I think I knew just enough about him to be dangerous (i.e. to know enough and have enough preconceived notions to think I know.). So reading your post was very interesting and informative. Thanks.

    BTW, I'm blogging the AtoZ at my gardening blog at http://foodgardeningsa.blogspot.com

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    1. LOL. I know that danger point. Writing has opened my eyes to the necessity of ALWAYS researching your facts, even when you think you're in the know. I've been wrong too many times. =)

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  15. When I was a kid, I struggled with reading. Many of the kids in my class were reading in higher levels than me. In 1st grade I had a hard time sounding out certain sounds like "th" "sh" and "ch". In 4th grade I had a tough time with bigger words. But in 5th grade I wanted to change that and started to read more than usual. By 6th grade I was a bookworm. :D

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    1. Yeah! Power to the bookworms. We can overcome, eh?

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  16. I think I'll try and take the reading test. Just for kicks. I'm the "a-novel-every-day" Kind of person too (when i have the novels and when i have the time) haha
    Sania @ Fragile Words

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    1. My goodness, I hear you. If I could spent more time reading, I'd probably burn through 1.5 books a day. Alas, reality beckons. ;)

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  17. i'm guessing she isn't allergic to ketchup... and i love the concept of "Counting to D!"
    you can ignore the test results - you're an adult and a writer and pooh on testing! i'm a slow reader and i'm brilliant! ha!
    and go BYU! glad you told me about his amazing accomplishments!
    happy b day!

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    1. Yes! I'm totally with you on the test thing, and yes, yes you are brilliant. =)

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  18. Thanks for hosting me last week! :)

    I'm guessing #3, but I really don't have a clue!

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    1. I know! These things can be so tricky, eh?

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  19. I'm the opposite when it comes to reading, since I had hyperlexia at age three and always read several grade levels above me. A number of people have asked me who taught me to read at such a young age, or commented on how I was obviously taught by parents who love reading, and I always have to explain just what hyperlexia is. It's full-blown, advanced reading at a young age. No one teaches you. It just comes to you.

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    1. That's awesome. I guess you have to have both extremes, eh? Now I'm going to use that in a story. I had no idea!

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  20. Great post. Don't forget the influence Young had in Wyoming. :D

    There are different kinds of reading. I don't mind speed reading a text book, but I don't want to speed read for leisure. I read in my head the way I would in my mind.

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    1. I love that. You should enjoy the words. I just find they collect a little faster in my brain than they used to.

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  21. I feel intelligent today because I remembered some of those things about Brigham Young from school - and that was a pretty long time ago lol!

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  22. I'm also Dyslexic. It's been the thing I have to work on (you know, actually reading the words rather than letting my brain guess what it says and just go with it... though that's sort of fun when I misread things badly on the road!).

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    1. Kudos to you, Rena. I'm in awe of anyone who has overcome, or continues to overcome such an incredible challenge!

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  23. Happy IWSG post day. :) Overcoming obstacles and hurdles can be tough. But YAY for you doing so, Crystal!! Your blog has such a wonderful feel to it. LOVE the purple. Have a blast with the A to Z challenge!

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    1. Will do! Great to see you here, Candilynn.

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  24. I never had an issue with reading, but they told me I figured out math equations rather slowly. I was good at math, but plodding and methodical. I guess that just means I won't be getting a job as a bank teller anytime soon! :)

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    1. LOL. You're a better author anyway. ;)

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  25. Wow, this post is chockful of info:) Interesting about the reading tests, but I wouldn't put much stock in them. My sister and I tested low on reading comprehension all our lives, and I have a doublemajor Undergrad and Masters in English! Those tests don't know nothing;)

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    1. So true. I figured that out in high school when I could pull 4.0's, but pretty much bombed standardized testing.

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  26. Don't worry about those darn tests. I was told the same thing as a kid and then put in a 'special' reading group. We moved soon after and the next school didn't see anything so special about me at all. I'm a slow reader (but not a bad one) and letters and words do get turned around for me. Yet, I graduated summa cum laude after studying literature and writing through a liberal arts degree in college. So much for tests.
    I love your posts.
    Deb@ Http://debioneille.blogspot.com

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    1. I hear you. Tests are bogus. They work for some people, but they're definitely not the best gauge for others.

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  27. Can I just say how much I love that you said, "I'm awesome." ???

    That's the best edification right there.

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  28. Celebrate in your averageness! You're just like the rest of us! lol! Along with awesome and all the other stuff. ;p

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    1. LOL! You're unique, just like everyone else. ;)

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  29. Wow, this IS a busy post!! Congratulations to everyone, and as for your reading tests - yeah, eff 'em. They clearly aren't accurate, and good for you for believing in the proof of your own eyes, rather than some random test.

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  30. I feel fortunate that I never struggled with reading. And I don't believe Kate is allergic to ketchup.

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    1. I'm so glad you never struggled. That's wonderful.

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  31. I used to struggle with comprehension when I was younger, but I got over that.

    Considering the volume of books you read and your retention of the information, I say you do just fine. Forget the test.

    IWSG #243, until Alex culls the list again.

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    1. Awesome. I'm somewhere in the late 100's...

      Thanks for the encouragement, Melissa.

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  32. Reading has always come really easy to me; I've been a bookworm since I was tiny. Maths, though, I cannot do. I'm forever glad my phone has a calculator on it.

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    1. LOL! I'm pretty okay at doing math in my head, but that skill didn't become particularly strong until I worked in retail. Forever ago.

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  33. Yay I won Emma's book. Thanks I'm really looking forward to reading it. Not sure this week, going to say #2.

    Sounds like you manage a lot more reading than me. I usually manage about 40 mins before bed.

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  34. Average? I can hear the scream. How can an avid read be average? I know you're right. You're not an average reader; you're a below average test taker, which in my book puts you in the above average category of human being with smart brain. Does that make sense? This is only day 2 of the challenge and I'm already doubting my writing ability. :-)

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    1. Oh my. See, that's why I write things in advance, so I don't second guess in the middle. You can do it!

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  35. You shouldn't judge yourself on that silly test. It's obviously wrong. Missouri wanted to exterminate Mormons? I think that says a lot about Missouri - and doesn't surprise me.

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    1. LOL! You and Missouri don't get along, eh?

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  36. I don't read multiple books at once but I do read several in a month. I wonder how my reading comprehension would be? I read awfully quickly!

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    1. Ooh! You should go get tested! Nope. Scratch that.

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  37. Wow. The number of books you read on a weekly basis astounds me. I used to read more when I worked in an office. I'd listen to audiobooks in my car on the drive, then listen while I was doing mundane tasks at work during the day. Now I'm writing so much, I only have time to read on the treadmill...which is only an hour a day or so.

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    1. Yes! I read while on the elliptical. *high five*

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  38. First Yay for Suzanne! That is awesome. Second, I know about Brigham. And I'm not even American. Wow, eh. Third, I'm guessing #1 is a lie. Last... I'm flying off to get my copy of Moonless! Yay.

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    1. Wahoo! How do you do that flying thing. Anti-gravity? Jet propulsion? ;)

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  39. Hi, Crystal. I sure hope #2 is a lie! That would be super annoying.

    Happy A to Z-ing! from Laura Marcella @ Wavy Lines

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    1. Laura! Great to see you here. I'm off to wave at those lines. =)

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  40. Oh Kate, we're almost neigbors. I now live on the other side of the Cascades, though. Congrats on your book! I'll guess your lie is #3.

    Well, Crystal, I missed most of 1st grade because of tonsilitis, so was behind most of my class in reading and most other things. They put me in remedial reading, which was frustrating because I was way ahead of the group. My mother brought us to the library every other week, and I read rabidly on my own. Comprehension tests are weird though, because we all process differently. Don't you think? Can it really measure that?

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    1. Absolutely not. My kids are freakin' brilliant, but do you think a test would tell you that? No.

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  41. I loved Kate's book. As to reading average - good for you! One doesn't have to read fast. It's not a contest. I read very quick, which has come in really handy w/ my review blog. But that also means that those great stories are over quicker. You get to enjoy them longer!

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  42. Oh my goodness, slow down, Crystal, slow down. You definitely have a lot going on, and it's amazing to me that you keep up with it all so well. Still your post today is full of so many things - Congrats to Suzanne, btw. And the history of Brigham Young is fascinating. I've never heard of anyone being allergic to ketchup, and there are a couple of health issues that could make one's foot fall asleep, so I'd have to go with #3. As for the slow down, remark - maybe I need to take my own advice on that one. You wrote a great post today!

    MJ, A to Z Challenge Co-Host
    Writing Tips
    Effectively Human
    Lots of Crochet Stitches

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    1. Thanks, MJ. We probably all need to slow down, eh?

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  43. My only reading problem isn't really a problem. (shhhh) I've been addicted to reading for as long as I can remember, and I will read just about anything. Even after giving away boxes and boxes of books, we still have so many of them, our house has probably sunk a foot or two.

    Very cool B post. I learned quite a bit about Brigham Young when I was researching for my post on Utah, but you taught me even more.

    Hmmm, I'll say number three is the fib.

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    1. I bet you learned a ton when doing your research. That post was amazing.

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  44. So much awesomeness in one post :) Definitely have heard of Brigham (thanks to BYU and all that fun :), and while I don't struggle with reading, I do seriously envy those who can read faster than I can. I'm slow. And no matter how much I read (which is, well, all the time) I never seem to speed up. Oh well!

    Okay, hmm, I'm going to go with #1 as the lie. Because ketchup is gross :)

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    1. I did speed up while doing online school--where it was do or die. I was shocked by how much difference it made to HAVE to read so much ALL THE TIME. It worked though.

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  45. I struggle with reading comprehension, meaning I can read something, probably read it and process it quickly, but ask me what I just read and I usually couldn't tell you. I think I'd like your ability to never forget.

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    1. =( Well, at least you get to rediscover things. That's pretty epic.

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  46. I hate taking tests. I'm better with open-ended responses than multiple choice too. I'm weird.

    I'm going to say #3 is the lie. But that would be really cool. ;)

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    1. You're not weird. I feel the same way.

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  47. My only reading issues have to do with time.

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  48. Great deal for MOONLESS! I'm horrible at taking tests too. I get over-anxious.

    My guess is going to be #3.

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    1. You're totally part of the club. We eat cheese on Thursdays. ;)

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  49. Overcoming major obstacles is the best. I suck at test taking!

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  50. Some people do suck at tests, so if you're reading so much and comprending what you read, forget it. I've always found reading so easy it's hard to understand that not everyone does. I devour books, mainly at night. Am yet to get to Moonless. I bought it months ago.

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    1. I hope you do love Moonless when you get to it, and then if you do, you leave me a review because you're amazing like that.

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  51. I have never struggled with reading, I feel for you... however; I am in awe of you, I never struggled and I used to read voraciously but it has been about a year since I have read one.. I need to remedy that :)

    By the way, great pick... I don't know if you knew this, I am a Latter Day Saint :)

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  52. My guess is, #2!
    Got your book. Hope it's not too scary! I'm such a wuss!
    I had no idea about it being legal to kill Mormons. What the heck? That's insane.
    I'm not the fastest reader on the block and I get a lot of eyestrain, so to keep up with my reading, I usually listed to the books with the text-to-speech feature in my Kindle. It's a robot voice that doesn't pronounce everything correctly, but, hey, it helps me keep reading. And sometimes I'm able to fork out the moola for an audiobook. Amazon offers a big discount on audiobooks (if available) when we buy the eBook, so I've done that a few times. I LOVE audiobooks!

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    1. Lyn, it's a little tense, but I hope you love it.

      You know history is filled with all kinds of shocking aspects. I guess that's why I love it--and audio books are epic. I'll be putting one out...soon...ish.

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  53. I was the freaky kid who taught herself to read (or so my kindergarten teacher said). But if you struggle with reading and you got an "average" score, I'd say that's exemplary for the rest of us.

    I did not know that Mormons were under an extermination order. That's so barbaric.

    As for the lie, I'm going to guess #1. (As I've been wrong the last month or so, I don't hold out much hope.)

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    1. Awesome that you taught yourself how to read!

      I have a feeling you might be right this month. (Shh! Don't tell anyone, but I could also be lying. Hm.)

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  54. I've never struggled with reading - according to my mom, I was reading when I was two years old, and stunning my relatives by reading advertisements out loud when we were out. But I agree that a test like the one you took is probably bogus. It's not like it measures how much you read and comprehend, right?

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    1. You are one of the lucky few. Way to be! Yeah, there was a comprehension part, but they were asking for details, like "what color was the girl's dress?" rather than "what happened here?"

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  55. Love that you highlighted Brigham Young in this post--great choice of an inspirational man!

    I am awed by how much you read! I agree with you, the more you read, the better writer you'll be. I'm still trying to figure out how to do both!

    I'm guessing the lie is #1.

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    1. It's definitely a balancing game. It's taken me YEARS to figure out how to balance my reading around everything else, but it is essential.

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  56. Oh those types of test make my blood boil. Clearly it's TOTALLY off base. I'd say your reading talents are inspirational.

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    1. Aw. You're so sweet, Leslie. Thank you.

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  57. Lots going on! Just got my copy of Moonless too! YAHOO! And I think that test is wrong. Those results just don't add up so it's good that you're ignoring them. And I'm going to bet that #2 is the lie, but it's hard to tell!!!

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    1. Yay! I hope you love it, Leigh, and thank you for the support.

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  58. Wow, wow, wow, so much to say after reading this post!

    First, yes, you are awesome. Listen to what you know, not what the test says.

    Second, I didn't know all that about Brigham! Nice little history lesson here.

    Third, I guessed right! Fun, even though I didn't win :)

    And fourth, I'm gonna guess the lie is #2, the foot falling asleep thing. (can that really happen?)

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    1. Julie, thanks for reading it all. I felt kind of bad about overwhelming people with ALL OF THIS during the A to Z Challenge, but there was no other way to fit in the entire day. *sigh* Thanks for the kind words, and as to the lie, I'm not really sure. I guess it could happen.

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  59. Were you a history major? :)

    I guess #3, forklift.

    Yvonne

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    1. Nope. I'm just a history geek. And love to research. Like a maniac.

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  60. Did you just say, "I want to be an accomplisher of epic stuff.."? You're an awesome author, that's epic in and of itself! If you want "epic music", I can help you out there *minus the "death and mayhem" commonly associated with epic films*

    WriterlySam
    A to Z #TeamDamyanti


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    1. Aw. You're awesome. I'll definitely take your help with epic music. I'm always searching for more.

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  61. My father had a genius IQ, but couldn't spell and had to teach himself to deal with the exact same reading problem you describe. But he conquered it!

    You will be epic! Mr. Young was quite the guy.

    The lie is the ketchup allergy.

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    1. Love you, Elizabeth. Way to go--to your dad. He sounds like an amazing man.

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  62. I wish you luck with your epic goals. Just ignore the test, it's clearly balderdash. A most informative post, thank you.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings

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    1. Glad to have enlightened your mind, Natasha. Thank you for stopping in!

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  63. I couldn't read at all for many years before I was treated for my bipolar disorder Crystal. I would see the words move around the page, or read a page and realise at the end of it, I'd not actually taken any of the information in and so have to start again. I gave up for the longest time. I still managed to achieve an upper second in my Psychology Degree somehow; perhaps because I could skim read non-fiction? I can't do that to fiction. So yeah, sod the silly reading test. Unlike you though, I read very slowly. Even with the meds, because although they allow me to focus and digest the words now, to do so they slow down my mind. Or at least, thats why I assume I read slowly. I have a niece who reads like you - very quickly - and she admits to skimming. I asked if she actually reads each word and she says she see whats happening more than reads it, so she doesn't need to read each word consciously like I do. And like you she recalls every book she's read, where my memory is useless. I'm warbling. It's clearly touched a nerve! :)

    The lie? #4?

    shahwharton.com

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    1. Man! See, that's what I'm talking about--those of us who overcome challenges. We're amazing. =)

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  64. I'll go with #1 as the lie and congrats on the book. Brigham is a true man, caring, strong and humble. Tests can be so stupid, your reading ability is perfectly fine Crystal.

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    1. Thanks for the vote of confidence, Sheena-kay. You are awesome.

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  65. If you remember everything you've read, I wouldn't say you have a reading problem at all! I can read quickly, but forget stuff - I've read the same Agatha Christie books over and over and still sometimes forget whodunit!

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    1. LOL. That's kind of awesome, you know--being able to enjoy the same book again and again and again.

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  66. Never struggled with reading - it's been a passion since 4 when I started picking up whatever book was around.
    I admire the vol of books you read.

    Happy A to Zing
    Cold Shadow

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    1. Wow. That is so awesome. I wish it could have been that way for me. It's not that I didn't read early or well, I just didn't enjoy it. Initially. But I wanted to know what was on the page.

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  67. Wow! I never heard of Brigham Young before, sounds like a great human being, I need to know more about him, you got me hooked. Fortitude, humility, and enterprising with the addition of courage happens to be the traits I respect the most and work hard to achieve. Well said :) You are my favorite Blogger for this challenge so far, I love to learn about history and influential people and you make it all sound so easy and engaging. Keep it coming!

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    1. LOL! I'm so glad you're enjoying the posts, and thank you Haneen. You are so sweet!

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  68. Did you know that dyslexic people are said to be one of the most intelligent and brilliant people? I'm not kidding. My daughter is dyslexic and that is what her teachers told me. Sir Issac Newton had dyslexia!

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    1. Awesome. I believe it. I mean, of the people I know of who are dyslexic, most are incredible achievers.

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  69. At primary school (I'm from the UK) I was put into what was back then called the 'remedial reading' group; I remember words on pages making no sense. Later, in secondary school, I was told by one of my English teachers that I was barely average and would never achieve anything. The day the letters in written words lined up to reveal their secrets to me still stands out as one o the most memorable moments of my life. As for the English teacher's pronouncement? I believed her for too long, but now have my first book on Amazon! So what did she know? Like the French teacher who told me never to consider studying foreign languages (but that's another story) ...
    As for dyslexia, it is about so much more than difficulties with spelling and reading. My daughter was diagnosed when she was around 8 years old; it's not really possible to diagnose accurately earlier. It also encompasses poor short term memory, lack of organisational skills and processing delays. Aged 20, we also discovered she has Irlen syndrome. The combined issues impact severely on reading, as well as other aspects of learning, but my daughter is living proof that determination and hard work reaps rewards. She graduated from university last year when many people with dyslexia sink to the bottom of the educational pile. For my daughter, a kindle has opened up the world of books, as black print on a white page is one of the worst combinations for a dyslexic reader! Changing the font size is great too. But dyslexic brains can be fabulously creative. And we love creative!

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    1. Indeed we do love creative! Way to go to your daughter. These battles are what define us, eh?

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  70. Those tests really bug me. (I don't even give too many tests in homeschool.) I enjoyed learning about Brigham, Crystal. What an interesting story. Are you a GEEK (for history)? *wink* Thanks for introducing me to Kate Scott. I love hearing about new books. I hadn't heard of this one before. Will check it out. Congrads to Suzanne!

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    1. LOL. I'm a TOTAL history geek. Those who don't learn from the past are doomed to repeat it. =)

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  71. I did some reading test the other day and the results seemed wrong too. Especially since I can read a 300 page book in about 4 hours. One time I sort of timed it. Well, I noticed the time I started reading and then looked at the time I finished. LOL

    ~Patricia Lynne~
    Story Dam
    Patricia Lynne, YA Author

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    1. LOL. Sort of timed it. Yeah... That's about how I do it. =)

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Hit me with your cheese!