Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Why You Should Never Rework an Old Story, IWSG, & Fantasy Giveaways


THANK YOU, CO-HOSTS!

The awesome co-hosts for today are Tamara Narayan, Patsy Collins, M.J. Fifield, and Nicohle Christopherson!

Led by Ninja King, Alex J. Cavanaugh.

The question this month is: Have you ever pulled out a really old story and reworked it? Did it work out?

A BIG fat YES to this. I have story folders that go all the way back to 1994, so most of my ideas are half written pieces that have been around for years, if not decades. However, in this instance, the piece I'm talking about was originally penned in 2003. It was MAJORLY rewritten about 5 times, with at least a hundred edits along the way, but the story saw its debut in 2013:


I think I'd call that a success. =)

In fact, I'm reworking another book originally penned in 2001. (Due to see the world around 2019ish.) Want a quick sample?



Wow. You can see how much you've grown as a writer when you decide to rework a relic. Regardless, if a story is solid, a story is solid, right? And if you love it enough, why not bring it up to the modern age? I know not all people agree with me, but some of us actually love to edit. *gasp*

So why should you never rework an old story? You might have to chop 90% of what you originally loved. If you can't go in objectively--with a big pair of scissors and determination to reshape EVERYTHING--stay far, far away from trunked works.

Now a quick apology about this last month. I completely disappeared after IWSG. It wasn't intentional...but well, more on that next month. Exciting news on the horizon.


Last month, Cecelia Earl (Aka Christy) shared WHEN ASH RAINS DOWN along with two truths and one lie. Anyone who guessed the lie correctly was entered to win their choice of a Print or eBook.

The game:

1. I've run a couple of miles...with no clothes on, and even saw a professor run in the nude once.
2. I've taught more than 300 children how to read and write.
3. Rather than visiting the normal sites to see when travelling through Europe and Great Britain, I chose to see cemeteries instead. Who needs to snap pictures of the Eiffel tower, Big Ben, or the Colosseum when there are graves to put flowers on?

The lie: #3.  

From Cecelia/Christy: I lied. I totally fangirl over the regular sights every time I visited these countries, especially the Eiffel Tower since I minored in French, but I did make  point of visiting Audrey Hepburn's grave in Tolochenaz, Switzerland. I very much wanted to put flowers on my idol's grave.

And the winner is:

...DRUM ROLL...

Congrats, Doreen!

And now for a YA fantasy you don't want to miss:

Princess Haven was never meant to be Queen.

Her immortality has saved her time and time again, but when the last of her royal family dies at her feet, she is next in line to rule a nation on the brink of war. With no formal training on how to be Queen, Haven must rise to the occasion with the help of her best friends, and personal guard, or risk losing everyone she has ever loved.

With war to the West, and no escape to the East, the evil tyrant Kadia sets her sights on the six kingdoms. Haven's neighbors are quick to fall under the swords of Kadia's shadow soldiers, leaving a sea of bodies and a clear path to Haven's only home. Haven must make a choice; take her people and flee to the foreign Republic across the sea or lead a last stand against a powerful dictator.

Buy your copy on Amazon.

Ready to meet the author?

Katherine Bogle's debut young adult novel, Haven, came second in the World's Best Story contest 2015. She currently resides in Saint John, New Brunswick with her partner in crime, and plethora of cats. She can be found at www.katherinebogle.com.

You might run across her eating marble cheese or monterey jack in little cracker sandwiches while sitting on her couch. She also recommends melted cheese on popcorn. "Holy yum!"

Katherine gave me two truths and one lie to test your "lie detector" skills. BIG CHANGE HERE. If you guess the lie, right or wrong, you will be entered to win an eBook of HAVEN. However, if you guess right (and are randomly chosen to win), you'll receive a bonus prize from Katherine: FYRE, a collection of short stories(Open internationally.)

You have until Tuesday, March 14 at 2 p.m. EDT to guess. Be sure to come back for the answer on March 15, 8 a.m. EDT.
TRUTH OR LIE

1. The second time I ever voted, I was nearly killed on the way to the polls.
2. To tell my first ever crush that I liked him, I chased him around the school yard until I kissed him. He was an a**hole to me in high school. Well deserved? Maybe.
3. I once had 8 cats (seriously, all at the same time).

So sleuths, which is the lie? Have you met Katherine? Do you like fantasy stories? Are you an editor at heart? Have you ever resurrected a story/old project?

201 comments:

  1. I'm a believer in reworking an old story. I chucked even more than that once.
    Tough one this time. I'll say the second one is the lie.

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  2. I believe reworking old stories can work, but you have to be ready to work and possibly be ruthless.

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  3. Oh yes, objectivity is a must in you plan to rework a relic project.

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  4. I rework old stories and/or ideas all the time! They can be fun and challenging at the same time. I think #1 is the lie.

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  5. That old story of yours definitely worked out quite well. :) Loved the new excerpt and looking forward to hearing the exciting news you have to share.

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  6. I agree with you. You can rework an old story. It's good to see how your writing has changes. I would say, be careful to not lose the voice/your voice. I love the sneak peek you gave.

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    1. Too true. It's easy to get lost in the translation.

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  7. I agree about having to go in and look at the story objectively. For me, it's usually the essence, a nugget of the story, a particular character that draws me back to a trunked work.

    Yeh for big news on the horizon!

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    1. Agreed. No matter how much time and distance separate you from that work, there's a fondness that never goes away.

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  8. I love that sample! And I know what you are capable of writing.

    #1 is the lie.

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  9. Yes, you definitely have to go in objectively. Maybe that's why I just rewrite the whole stories! Can't wait to hear the news. :) And my guess for the lie is #3.

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    1. That's an awesome approach! I always get stuck in little gems that I absolutely adore.

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  10. I have to sit on my editor at heart when I'm cranking out a rough draft. He tends to be a bit pushy. You will have us all guessing what your big news is!! Lie is #3

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    1. Pushy editors are good too though. You just need a prison cell for him. With sound dampeners. =)

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  11. I've re-worked many an old story. I've also pulled out some old ones whose only function was reminding me not everything I've written is worth salvaging.

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    1. LOL. I do have one story that I completely abandoned. One. It was SOOOO cliche.

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  12. Love the excerpt! Beautiful!
    Chucking the worst, a given. Even if it's 99%. LOL

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    1. Too true. I've never had to go that far, though.

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  13. Ooh, news teaser! Now I've got to wait to find out!

    Objectivity, yep - tough but darn useful :)

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  14. Your writing is always so beautiful! Oh my gosh. You're so right about needing to be willing to rework EVERYthing from an old project. The last two times I tried to rework something, they weren't too old, but I kept too much original stuff, and now they are a mess.

    It's not hard to have a lot of cats at once. I once had 11. Lol! I'm going with #2 for the lie. :)

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    1. Aw. You're so sweet.

      I hear you about keeping things. I had the same experience, and that's why I now view every aspect as expendable.

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  15. Thanks for sharing a snip of you "old" story!

    Hmm, I'm going to guess #2...

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  16. I think there's great potential in old manuscripts, articles, etc. But like you said, you need to be willing to make big changes as necessary. With a side of cheese, of course. :)

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    1. Of course. Speaking of cheese... Now I'd better go get some.

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  17. I loved Haven!
    I cringe when I read my writing from years ago. Luckily, I'm an editing fan too. How neat that you dug that one out and gave it a good dusting!

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  18. 90% is a big percentage to dump, LOL. But if you end up with something awesome, it's all good.

    AND, my guess is #2 is the lie--they were probably high school sweethearts <3

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    1. Did you see other people talking about 99%? I think that would kill me.

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  19. If you're passionate about a story, there's absolutely no reason why you shouldn't go back to an old story. You won't mind if 90% of it has to be cut. Good luck on the revising.

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  20. I don't mind chopping something down as long as I can add to it afterward. Great post. ;-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  21. I'm excited for your news! And I'm currently trying to rework an old story - I'm not sure if I'm quite ready to chop that much yet... It's slow going. My guess is #3 is the lie?

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    1. Yay, thanks! I think it takes time to build courage on that front. Take it as it comes, eh?

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  22. Hi Crystal - I hope you had a closer look at Kustodiev - he had an interesting life ... inspiring. Re old stories - now they're on discs or forgotten about as no paper versions around ...

    But yes Moonless - that was a clever pull out of the piles of paper and then the re-write - success - exactly as you say ...

    Cheese - I'm trying to stay off it .. it is difficult! Cheers Hilary

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    1. =( Tell you what, I'll eat all the cheese for you. Deal?

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  23. I'd say that was a success. :) I also have a folder of partially written stories that I'll visit every now and then. The MG fantasy I'm working on now is one that I kept 10% of the story and rewrote the rest. I think it's working.

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    1. That's what you have to do, eh? Here's to gutting and remodeling!

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  24. I'm glad you chose to rework an old story! I know my original was wayyyyyy different than my end result.

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  25. I don't know that I want to look at any of my old stories (the ones I never finished). Maybe I should! :)

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    1. LOL! You might be pleasantly surprised by what you find.

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  26. looks like Alexis Bleddel on the cover of HAVEN :)

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    1. It really does. I didn't even (consciously) make the connection.

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  27. Oh yeah. I know when I start revising my work from the 90s that most, if not all of it, will be slashed and burned. An idea I both love and hate.

    I will guess that #1 is the lie.

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    1. It's fun rewriting it, eh? And it's sad shredding so much...

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  28. I'm working on an old story now and hoping it will be a good move! Agree that it certainly helps you see how far you've come as a writer. I enjoy editing so hoping it's full steam ahead with this one!

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    1. Here's the editors! I love it too. A little too much.

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  29. I am going with number one as the lie...and yes, we do need to look at our work objectively to succeed. We should want our work to be clear to others if we wish to publish:) that's awesome how your novel because such a hit too!

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  30. I think #2 is the lie. If you kissed him he'd be nice to you forever. Well I think so anyway.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  31. I don't know what percentage of my old manuscript I changed to turn it into "Hot Flashes..." but it was a LOT. Every edit meant new changes. Because of the number of rewrites I did on that one, I thought I didn't like to edit. I was wrong. I enjoy it. I'm looking forward to getting the darned first draft finished so I can tear it apart and put it back together again. :)

    Your excerpt sounds great! Good luck with bringing the story back to life.

    All three of those truth/lies sound possible to me, so I'll just go with #3 as the fib. (Maybe she only had SEVEN cats... )

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    1. Thanks, Susan. And do I ever hear you. I love editing too, but not until that crappy first draft is out of the way.

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  32. I'm envious of your ability to rework old stories and turn them into gold. My old stuff is definitely not gold. Not even brass. But hey, with so many new ideas every day, I figure why dwell on the old when I've got plenty of new.

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    1. It's true. You have to do what works for you!

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  33. It's great that you can take something and redo it until you're satisfied. And disappearing is a good thing when you need to have time for other things.

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  34. I'm guessing number one is the lie. At least I'm hoping because it seems much worse than the other two!

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  35. I may be the only writer in existence who has no old stories. I have some old flash fiction, but nothing substantial enough to rework. I suspect the two manuscripts I have on submission now will one day qualify as old stories, however. :)

    Is #2 the lie?

    VR Barkowski

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    1. LOL. Hey, give it time. They'll be old soon enough, eh?

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  36. Sounds like a good story to go back to. I've been a little absent on blogging too but trying to do better this month.

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    1. That's the best we can do sometimes, eh?

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  37. All these success tales of reworking a story has me wanting to go back to a few of mine. LOL

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    1. LOL! But you've got so many other awesome things in the works... ;)

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  38. haha yep, when reworking you can surely tell how far you have come, and cringe at some of the stuff you used to write too.

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    1. I know! Makes you grateful no one saw it in the earlier state.

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  39. I find I'm more objective when it comes to editing or reworking old ideas than I am with more recent work. I think I'm less attached to stuff that obviously I wasn't ready to write. And you are right! You have to be ready to delete and delete and edit and delete and edit and edit. Great post!

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    1. Thanks, Ryan. It's true. The distance always helps us gain perspective. It's when we're too close to a work that we're in trouble.

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  40. I think we need to be object with our work no matter how old it is. You need to be able to look at your stuff and be willing to cut whatever you have to in order to make it work, whether you wrote it 10 minutes ago or 10 years ago.

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    1. I completely agree, but sometimes that's difficult one the tail end of writing euphoria. =)

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  41. Your clip from "Neitherlands" had my hands sweating and my stomach knotting, Crystal, because I am very afraid of heights. It reminded me of a story I have hidden away in one of my files, sketched out in 1979: a different girl on a different rock face frozen by fear of falling. I believe if you love a story you should write it. At some point I plan to pull it out. I'm guessing #3 is the lie. Have a great IWSG Day!

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    1. I'm so sorry to put you through that. I was living the moment as I wrote it because I wanted to ring true to readers. My hope was that it would instill a sense of empathy in the reader that forms an instant connection with the character.

      Let me know when you pull that story out. I can't wait to read it!

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  42. What great insider secret about Moonless. I love hearing that, Crystal.

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    1. I think too often we get trapped into thinking what someone else wrote was perfect after the first draft. It's definitely good to realize that's never the case. =)

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  43. It's so true about growing as a writer. Sometimes I open my first published book and FREAK OUT...lol. I can't believe how much I've learned.
    www.jessicatherrien.com

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    1. But everyone MUST have a debut novel. We're just never supposed to look at it again after publication, right?

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  44. Most of my characters have been with me since I was a preteen or in my early teens, so I'm no stranger to reworking. However, I decided not to bother with a radical rewrite and restructuring of the first series I wrote with my Atlantic City characters, since not only would it involve more frogging, fleshing-out, and revising than were worth the effort, but it would also create too much overlap with my other two series/sagas about these characters. There are only so many ways you can depict the same general events happening to the same characters in the same timeline before it becomes the same story over and over again. I now only have the prequel series, and two series focused on special characters and their families. At one point, I had at least a dozen spin-off series planned or in progress.

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    1. Crazy! I love how one idea can spawn a hundred others.

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  45. 2nd one is a lie.

    As I say on other blogs I've visited today, never throw anything away. Never know when an old idea might well become a brilliant idea for the future. Good on you to take something from your box and make it gold.

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    1. It's true. Never throw anything away, but know when to put it aside for sure.

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  46. I think I'd have a hard time with being objective about my own writing. I'd want to hang on to so much of the original content, I'd do better starting over with the premise than I would trying to trim it down and revise it.

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    1. Yes indeed. That's the way it starts, until you realize it's all about the audience and what they want to read.

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  47. I love to edit too. Sadly, I'm in the first draft portion of the novel, so I'm not happy...

    I'll guess the lie is #1.

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  48. I guess it's a good thing you stuck with that story! :D
    I think I've become more ok with making cuts/changes over the years. Even if something seems good, it may not work for the story. I just try to think of what the story really needs, and not whether or not it hurts me to change something.

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    1. Exactly! I used to shy away from changes. Now I look at them from an analytical standpoint.

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  49. I love slashing my words and creating different stories with them - I'm just about ready to start on a rewrite of a novel I've actually been rewriting since 1995-ish. But this time, the story is very different, just the vague premise - alongside another - has remained :-)

    Good luck with yours!

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    1. Thanks, though no luck needed. This is going to be a labor of love. =) I hope you have just as much fun with yours.

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  50. Yep, I agree, reworking a story usually only works when you're able to pull it apart first.

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    1. Completely.
      Oh, and #3 is the lie. No one has cats. The cats have them.

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  51. Everything I work on is a resurrected story! I have a trilogy, old as the hills, that I adore, dearly, but it's going to need some serious work and I don't have it in me. However, I'm well aware that all my old stories need serious rework. I've been doing that today as a matter of fact. The novel I'm working on was "written" four-five years ago. It's TERRIBLE! But I LOVE the idea. And, yes, I ADORE editing :D I guess that's why this works for me.

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    1. LOL! It's TERRIBLE. =) You make me laugh. Here's cheering you on toward epic awesomeness!

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  52. I love editing my old stuff. Very satisfactory to see how much I improved as a writer.
    Great excerpt from your story, by the way.

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    1. Thanks, Olga. I feel exactly the same way.

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  53. Hmm. Well I did once take a flash fiction piece and turn it into a trilogy. So that's kind of like reworking something old, right?

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  54. Moonless!!! I'm so happy you rewrote it. Five times. ;)

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  55. Love it! Kiri sounds like a terrific character! :) Can't wait!

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  56. Yay for Katherine! This sounds awesome. And I'm going with #3 as the lie :)

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  57. I'm going to hope that #3 about the cats is the lie, hehe.

    Crystal, I'm like you - an editing lovin' fool! Thanks for commenting at my blog today - that comment is what make me remember it's IWSG day!!

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  58. Thanks for stopping by my blog. I totlly get your point about being able to cut down a story. I sometimes have that issue. Glad rewriting your story worked out for you.
    I think the lie is #3.

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    1. I think we all have that issue, no matter how good our intentions.

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  59. Congratulations to Katherine. Enjoy working on your "nes" story, Crystal. Love the story behind Moonless. I think #1 is the lie. Have a great week.

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  60. Umm, that should be "new". I cannot see clearly, true. Am seeing double after cataract surgery. Try typing that way.

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    1. Aw. Beverly, you're a doll. Thanks for stopping in.

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  61. Congrats on re-writing old stories to make great new novels! Congrats also to Doreen for winning!

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  62. Secrets of Honor was a reworked old book. The names were the same, but not much else. Sometimes it does work out. Work is the key word.

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  63. I agree. When taking out a "trunk" novel or short story, it's best to go in with the idea that it's all going to be new (with some bits of the old left).
    Congrats on all that you do, Crystal!!! Super impressed, as always.

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    1. Crumbs of the original, eh? You rock, Tyrean.

      Delete
  64. I'm going to say #1 is the lie.

    As for reworking an old story, I say yes, as long as you can be realistic about it. I know I have lots of great trunk ideas half written, but I'm also guessing there's a reason they're in the trunk.

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  65. I went back to my very first story and realized how HORRIBLE it really was. I will resuscitate it, cause I love the characters, but it will take less time to re-write it then to edit it. :)
    Great post!
    Heather

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    1. Lol. Thankfully my early drafts aren't that bad.

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  66. Congrats on both Moonless and Awakening. Loved your sample!

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    1. Thanks, Sandra. I've missed hanging with you online.

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  67. Congrats on reworking your book to the point of getting it published. That is exciting. Good luck with the upcoming project. I'm not a person that enjoys the edits. It pains me to cut things even if I know it's needed. I'll get there one day.

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    1. I SO remember that stage. When my hubby would read for me and tell me to ax things, I'd just glare at him. We do grow, eh?

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  68. I love that you have so much material going way back!

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    1. You'd better believe it! I'd pull out my cartoon strips from before then and count them as well, except no one will ever see that stuff in the light of day.

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  69. Like repurposing old blog posts. :)
    Nice to know.

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    1. It's true! Been there, done that.

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    2. Looking forward to this re-purposed work of yours. That part you share makes me feel like I'm also on top of the mountain. Tingling feeling in my feet.

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  70. Oh yes, that is a success. Can't wait to hear your new news.

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  71. A little time and distance can do wonders for your perspective on a story that wasn't working. But yeah, you have to be prepared to go in with a meat cleaver sometimes. @mirymom1 from
    Balancing Act

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  72. "You might have to chop 90% of what you originally loved" - that is truly the mark of a writer. It's knowing how to mine the bits of gold from the rock that leads to success in our field. Thanks for sharing your successes.

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    1. Agreed. When we come to that magical point, we've arrived.

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  73. Congrats on the revision success! Sending virtual cheese your way!

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    1. *eats the virtual cheese* *still feels hungry* ;)

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  74. Hi, Crystal, thanks for commenting on my blog because it made me realize I FORGOT IWSG! I like your excerpt. Looks like you're the master of reworking old stories!

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    1. Lol! Glad to be of service. And thank you for the kind words.

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  75. Major rewrites of old works aren't easy, but they can pay off.

    I'll say #1 is the lie.

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  76. I loved Moonless! So glad you brushed it off and reworked it. You're right about taking scissors and cutting away the old material, that's what I'm starting now with another oldie, but hopefully goodie.

    Have a nice week.

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    1. Aw! Thanks so much.

      *hands you a scissor sharpener* Good luck. You've got this!

      Delete
  77. I love the first stages of editing, when we can't help but improve things. Less keen on the final fiddly bits.

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  78. I can imagine how much a really old work could need rewriting and not just revision. Proceed with caution and certainty!

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    1. Too true! Actually, I rewrite 90% of the prose, but usually keep 70 to 80% of the plot.

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  79. I'm glad exciting news is why you disappeared. I love the excerpt of your WIP. I really want to know what it is she's needing.

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    1. Yay! The snippet does its job. There will be more teasers I'm the coming year.

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  80. I'm intrigued now and excited to hear your exciting news. Yes I rework old ideas and stories.
    Happy IWSG Belated Day!
    Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

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    1. Thanks, Juneta. I was sad to miss out on the last blog hop, but well, yeah...

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  81. Good thing you didn't give up! And yes, a solid story is a solid story.

    I'm going with the 8 cats as the lie. I'm betting there was only 7. :)

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    1. Right? I could have after a certain number of rejections.

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  82. I like editing, but that's where my problem exists. I never stop. But it's awesome that you have been able to rewrite your old stories and give them new life. New, successful life. :) That's when you know you your writing has improved.

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    1. Or at least you hope it does over a period of 10 years, eh? ;)

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  83. I think of all my WIPs as seeds awaiting creative nutrients. Reworking an old manuscript feels as if I'm resurrecting a neglected garden with equal amounts of hope and trepidation. Yet, somehow it's worth it ;-)
    Now if I could only teach my house plants to bark when they're thirsty...

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    1. Lol! Depending on the number of house plants, that could make for a very noisy house. ;)

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  84. So many of my early stories have themes I love, but aren't written all that well. But going back is difficult and not always worth it.

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    1. Themes are so interesting. Isn't it interesting how different themes resonate with us at different times?

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  85. Awesome that you could make a success out of an old story. And another one on the way? Wonderful. I hate that I didn't keep any of my much earlier stuff.

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  86. I like that sample, I can almost feel the fear with her climbing. I don't have much to rework besides ideas from my high school days. I have a short story from 2015 that I thought I would rework, but the only thing I've decided to keep is one of the characters. Now he needs to find a new home.

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  87. I think the sample is good... I was scared ... heights really get to me, I am not sure I could do that at all... I am sure the book will turn out great Crystal xox

    I don't write like you do but I have noticed that my writing has grown a great deal from nearly 8 years ago when I started blogging... Have a great week, I look forward to you news next month xox

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  88. Yep, I've rewritten my very first book a few times. It's not right yet, but I love the story and characters so much it will see its day at some point :)

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  89. I am not a writer so I can't speak on any experience, but I admire and appreciate good writers and you are one of them, Crystal. :)

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  90. Well done. No work is ever wasted, is it? We use everything sooner or later.

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  91. I love reading stories about old words that are revived and turned into these awesome stories! I bet you're glad you decided to reword Moonless for the hundredth time! :)

    Congrats to Katherine! Love her cover! Her book sounds really interesting!

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  92. Reworking a story can pay off.

    Congrats to Katherine! Love those covers. I'm guessing #3 as the lie. Eight cats just don't seem like enough. ;)

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  93. I'm about 75% of the way through 'Moonless' and I concur, it certainly did pay off.

    I recently reworked a full length novel into a short story for an Anthology. Submitted it and still waiting o see how that worked out.

    BTW, I think the lie is #3.

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  94. I am so late but I'm here! I am going to start reworking a story I started in my teens because I still dream about it. It is SO old but I think it will haunt me forever if I don't try. YAY!! I'm a winner!! That doesn't happen often:) I can't wait to hear your big news...

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  95. I can't wait to find out what's going on!!

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  96. Curious about your technique: When you rework a story, do you edit the old one—or read the old one then start writing fresh?

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  97. Not what I expected from the "you should never rework an old story" header. ^_^ But I'm glad that rework worked out so well for you. I too have story notes dating back many years, and I have some things I've reworked and still other stuff I'm considering reworking. And I agree, the only way to make a rework work is to accept that you might have to change a great, great deal of it.

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  98. Looks like reworking is definitely working out for you:) I think it's great to revisit old stories and modernize them. My problem is I get excited, start revising, then my confidence drops and then I remember why I hid it away in the first place. Ugh. I need to slip out of that mind frame and just go with it. Glad you had a break and excited about the news coming out way, xoxo!

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  99. Wow, I feel the same way about rewriting an old ms. It's a lot of work.

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  100. Sounds like you made it work, but yeah, it's definitely not easy. I can't help but think of what someone said about dating your exes. It's like re-chewing bubble gum, he said. All the flavor's gone out!

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  101. Awesome that reworking pieces you had put aside worked out so well for you. I can imagine that taking one out of the "trunk" would definitely require a lot of editing, snipping, and reworking.

    I am not always the best at figuring out the lies. This time I am guessing #2. :)
    ~Jess

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  102. First, 166 comments?! Looks like absence makes the heart grow fonder; your blog is reaching Ninja Cap'n levels of popularity! I guess the amount of work required in reworking such an old story means it would be a no for some, but you've shown how great the rewards might be. For what it's worth, I'm intrigued about what it is that's leading Kiri to undertake such a treacherous journey. As for the lie... I'll go for #3.

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  103. I need to write a story before I can rework it. :)
    I think #1 is the lie.

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  104. I think number 3 is the lie because it also sounds the most possible and I am terrible at guessing these things. And my sister has 8 or more cats as well. Nobody else could possible be that nuts.

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  105. I almost just reworked a play. Glad I didn't, just for time's sake, but yes, you can definitely see how much you've grown as a writer!

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  106. Number three is the lie. I bet she had seven!

    And I so can't wait to hear your exciting news, Crystal. I bet it's amazing!

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  107. That excerpt is quite intriguing!
    I haven't been writing long enough to enjoy the pleasure/pain of reworking an entire novel. It must be a headache!

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  108. I was doing writing when I was a child, and never reworked stories - I was too afraid of that! :-)

    Have a great day,
    -Kati
    Almost Stylish

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  109. Your book due for 2019 sounds awesome! It's so cool when you revisit old works and are able to polish them up.

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  110. My guess is the lie is you had 8 cats at one time.

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  111. That's such an inspiring story about an old manuscript. And Haven is a beautiful cover.

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  112. You book sounds good and if you reworked Moonless than yes, you can do it!

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  113. Most of my "old stories" are bare bones notes and outlines so there's not much to worry about cutting out. And I do hate cutting down stuff I've written although I probably shouldn't allow myself to become so infatuated with it.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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Hit me with your cheese!